Additional Documents Required for B-1 Visa Applicants

You are required to furnish additional documents.  The documents required will depend on your reason for travel.

Business Visitors

Business visitors must furnish a letter from their U.K. employer and/or inviting organization in the United States that states their name, date and place of birth and foreign address and contains information regarding the purpose and location, duration of and source of funding for the business trip to the United States.

Traveling For Medical Treatment

Travelers entering the United States for medical treatment are required to furnish documentation from the medical facility in the United States describing the treatment to be received, the required length of stay and the full cost of the treatment They are also required to furnish financial documentation showing that they have access to sufficient funds to cover all associated costs.

Particpants in Scientific, Educations, Professional, or Business Conventions, Conferences or Seminars

Participants are required to furnish a letter from the inviting organization in the United States that states their name, date and place of birth, topic of the paper being presented, if appropriate and source of funding. They are also required to furnish a letter from their employer or academic institution which provides information on their status in the Republic of Ireland and position within the organization or academic institution. Professionals and academics in the area of science and technology are also required to furnish a complete curriculum vitae and list of publications.

Working on the Outer Continental Shelf

Applicants performing services on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) must provide a letter from their employer naming the specific ships(s) and length of time they will be required to perform services. They are also required to furnish a letter from the U.S. Coastguard confirming that the ship(s) named in the employer’s letter have been exempted from the OCSLA regulations restricting the employment of non-Americans and non-resident aliens on the OCS.

Voluntary Workers

Individuals participating in a voluntary service program which benefits a U.S. local community, and are a member of, and have a commitment to, a particular recognized religious or nonprofit charitable organization are required to furnish a letter from the organization that states their name, date and place of birth, address in the Republic of Ireland and initial address in the United States. It should include information on the nature of the organization, proof that the organization is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3)of the IRS code, the exact activities to be undertaken by the volunteer, anticipated length of the assignment and details of how the volunteer be supported, e.g. an allowance from the organization or self-funding. If the volunteer will be self supporting, s/he will be required to furnish documentation to show that s/he has sufficient funds to support her/himself for the entire proposed duration of stay.

Commercial or Industrial Workers

Engineers traveling to the United States to install, service or repair commercial or industrial equipment or machinery sold by a foreign company to a buyer within the United States, are required to furnish a letter from their employer stating their name, date and place of birth, position within the company, source of remuneration, and length of time required in the United States. They are also required to furnish a copy of the purchase contract between the two companies and evidence confirming that they possess the specialized knowledge essential to perform the services they are to provide.

Crew Members on a Private Yacht

Crew members working on a private yacht are required to furnish a letter from their employer which states their name, date and place of birth, and terms and duration of employment.

Medical Elective

Medical students studying at foreign medical schools who seek to enter the United States temporarily in order to take an “elective clerkship” at a U.S. medical school’s hospital are required to furnish a letter from the U.S. medical school outlining the nature and duration of the elective clerkship. They are also required to furnish a letter from the foreign medical school which states their name, date and place of birth, the length of the degree course and period of time they have left before they graduate.

Domestic Employees, including au pairs accompanying a nonimmigrant visa holder to the United States

Domestic employees, including au pairs who are accompanying or following to join an employer who seeks admission to, or who is already in, the United States in B, E, F, H, I, J, L, M, O & P, Q, or R nonimmigrant status may be eligible for B-1 visa classification provided:

  • The employee has been employed outside the United States by the employer for at least one year prior to the date of the employer’s admission to the United States, or if the employer-employee relationship existed immediately prior to the time of application, the employer can demonstrate that he has regularly employed (either year-round or seasonally) domestic help over a period of years preceding the time of application;
  • The employee has at least one year’s experience as a personal or domestic servant as attested to by statements from previous employers;
  • The employee has a residence abroad which he or she has no intention of abandoning;
  • The employer and the employee have signed an employment contract which contains statements that the employer is guaranteed the minimum or prevailing wages, whichever is greater (Further information is available from the Department of Labor’s website at www.dol.gov), and free room and board, and the employer will be the only provider of employment to the employee.

Domestic Employees, including au pairs accompanying a U.S. Citizen to the United States

Domestic employees, including au pairs accompanying or following to join their United States citizen employer in the United States may be eligible for B-1 visa classification if their employer ordinarily resides outside the United States and is traveling to the United States temporarily, or the employer is subject to frequent international transfers lasting two years or more and who, as a condition of employment, is going to reside in the United States for a stay not to exceed four years. It is not possible to qualify for a B-1 visa if the United States citizen will reside permanently in the United States, even if the individual concerned has previously been in the United States citizen’s employ abroad. In addition:

  • The employer-employee relationship must have existed for at least six months prior to the employer’s admission to the United States or, alternatively, that the employer has regularly employed a domestic servant in the same capacity while abroad;
  • The employee has had at least one year experiences as a personal or domestic servant by producing statements from previous employers attesting to such experience;
  • The employer will be the only provider of employment, and will provide the employee free room and board and round trip airfare as indicated under the terms of the employment contract.

At the time of applying for the visa, the employee is required to furnish an employment contract that has been signed and dated by the employer and employee and contains a guarantee from the employer, that in addition to the provisions in item (3), the employee will receive the minimum or prevailing wages, whichever is greater for an eight hour work-day. (Further information is available from the Department of Labor’s website at www.dol.gov). The employment contract must also reflect any other benefits normally required for U.S. domestic workers in the area of employment. The employer will give at least two weeks notice of his or her intent to terminate the employment, and the employee need not give more than two weeks notice of intent to leave the employment.